• Over the past year I have been working from two different motifs, swamps and flora. The flora paintings consist of flowers and plants from my home garden and serve as compositional arrangements that I paint in situ. Sometimes I augment the found compositions with store bought flowers or take cuttings into my studio for still life arrangements. The swamp paintings are destination paintings requiring me to pack up my gear and drive many miles from home to hike deep into the woods, searching for a painting. Although both motifs are related, for me they are quite opposite: the near and far, the familiar and the unknown. Both subtly change with the seasons. As different flowers bloom, they provide me with fresh colors and textures to work from. The swamp paintings change with the arc of the sun and with the rising and falling of the water level. Things begin to grow on the surface of the water. The color of the water changes depending on the rain, the amount of tannins that leech into the water. It changes from coffee color to deep violet, almost black. What attracts me to paint a subject is usually a formal concern, either a color or combination of colors, shapes and patterns, or a light effect. Observed moments slip in and out of clarity…a brush stroke will dissolve into a color shape. Light will create a flickering effect on the surface of the water….marks are buried and others are allowed to show through. I set up and react to the things in front of me. Within a painting session that has a beginning and an end, some passages are clarified while others are covered up and disappear. The painting continuously oscillates between generalizations and clarified forms. Returning to the motif continues like this until it is exhausted, until I can no longer find a relationship of elements which hold my interest. It is then that the painting is finished.